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Are Spiders Living In Your House?

In Missouri, there are many different types of spiders that can be found crawling around or hiding in your home. While many are harmless, and will actually eat and help remove other pesky insects, some can be very dangerous. However, most people's fear of spiders are psychological, but, there are many poisonous spiders in the St. Louis area that can be a real threat and cause sever health issues if bitten.

Another common issue with spiders, is that they produce spider webs. Spider webs themselves are not harmful, but they can give the impression that your home or business is not clean, and can be very uninviting. Spiders can also leave eggs, and waste, in corners or small crevices, both inside and outside your house.

Spiders are very sneaky, like to hide in dark places, and can bite. If you see spiders crawling around your home or business, or see webs hanging from the ceiling, you should call a professional spider control company immediately. West County Pest Control can help remove any spiders that may be hiding or crawling around your home. Call or Contact Us Today!

Spiders have adapted to live in nearly every type of habitat, and they are one of the top 10 most diverse populations on earth. They play vital roles in all ecosystems- except in your home. The following spider facts will help you learn more about these eight-legged pests, some of which might appear in your backyard this summer and fall.

Brown Recluse
Brown Recluse

Appearance: Adults are 6-12mm in length with a tan-brown coloring and a pattern on the thorax resembling the shape of a violin. The eyes are arranged in three pairs forming a semi-circle. They are not commonly indigenous to the midwest, but may be transported.

 

Habitat: It is very rare to encounter a brown recluse spider. Chances are, if you found a spider in your home that is light brown, it's most likely NOT a brown recluse. They live in dry areas with little to no air flow and no activity. They are extremely reclusive creatures and won't live in harmony with active humans or activity of any sort, thus the name.

Appearance: Typically brown or tan with various markings; the body ranges up to 3/8" in length, with a spherical abdomen.

Habitat: This is the spider most commonly found indoors. It is more of a nuisance than a threat, probably more because of its webs than the spider itself. Indoors, house spiders are most likely to be found in upper corners, under furniture, in closets, around window frames, and in basements, garages and crawl spaces.

House Spider
House Spider
Cellar Spider
Cellar Spider

Appearance: Up to 3/4" in body length, with an extremely thin body structure. Pale yellowish, light brown or grey. Their extremely long legs make these spiders appear much larger and give them their nickname of “daddy long legs”.

 

Habitat: Cellar spiders prefer dark, damp areas such as crawl spaces, basements and shed, although they may be found around doorways, in warehouses and sometimes in garages of homes.

Appearance: Dark brownish grey with lighter striped markings on legs. Females are typically 3/8 to 1 3/8" in length, while male wolf spiders are about 1/4 to 3/4" long. They tend to be big and hairy, which alarms people, but they are just considered a nuisance, not a harmful spider.

Habitat: Wolf spiders are found in nature under stones, wood, leaves and other low-lying debris. Indoors, the wolf spider prefers floor-level turf along walls, under furniture and in basements, where other insects may be found.

Wolf Spider
Wolf Spider
Orb Weaver
Orb Weaver

Appearance: Orb weavers, or garden spiders, are very brightly colorfully patterned.

Habitat: Orb weavers love vegetation, moisture, and areas that are home to many other types of insects. You can find them in your cucumber patch, your flower beds, or your shrubs.